CCR 611: Comp Histories/Theories

Rhetoric at the Margins: Revising the History of Writing Instruction in American Colleges, 1873-1947

In the preface to his book, Gold offers some context for his site selection and the arguments he plans to develop. The purpose of his book is to examine rhetorical education at three historically neglected institutions: Wiley College (a private HBCU), Texas Woman’s University (a public all-women’s college), and East Texas Normal school (an independent… Continue reading Rhetoric at the Margins: Revising the History of Writing Instruction in American Colleges, 1873-1947

CCR 611: Comp Histories/Theories

Word from the Mother: Language and African Americans

Black or African American Language (BL or AAL) is a style of speaking English words with Black flava—with Africanized semantic, grammatical, pronunciation, and rhetorical patterns. AAL comes out of the experience of U.S. slave descendants. This shared experience has resulted in common speaking styles, systematic patterns of grammar, and common language practices in the Black… Continue reading Word from the Mother: Language and African Americans

CCR 611: Comp Histories/Theories

A Counter-History of Composition: Toward Methodologies of Complexity

Once a way of thinking becomes so ingrained that no one bothers to question it, the most effective way to make it show up is to attempt the opposite argument that no one would even consider investigating. (10) Hawk begins his book with the claim that composition has misrepresented and reduced vitalism. Vitalism—“a set of… Continue reading A Counter-History of Composition: Toward Methodologies of Complexity

CCR 611: Comp Histories/Theories

Composition in the University: Historical and Polemical Essays

It was useful to read Crowley after Berlin and interesting to see her whole argument in this collection of essays as opposed to the one chapter I had been assigned to read before this (“A Personal Essay on Freshman English,” which made her seem so extreme that it was difficult to even fathom her argument).… Continue reading Composition in the University: Historical and Polemical Essays

CCR 611: Comp Histories/Theories · Rhetoric

Rhetoric and Reality: Writing Instruction in American Colleges, 1900-1985

Some things about reading for exams are wildly stressful—like trying to figure out how to cram all the books on the reading list into an unbelievably short period of time. Others, though, remind me of why I’m interested in this field. Re-reading Berlin was one of those reminders—not necessarily because I’m head over heels for… Continue reading Rhetoric and Reality: Writing Instruction in American Colleges, 1900-1985

CCR 611: Comp Histories/Theories · Pedagogy

Bringing World Englishes into the Comp Classroom

In “The Place of World Englishes in Composition,” Canagarajah asks, “What is the place of [World Englishes] in college writing?” (594), listing the many ways that World Englishes are seen as non-standard, informal, and otherwise unacceptable forms of English. He argues that should encourage students to use multiple Englishes both in process writing and in… Continue reading Bringing World Englishes into the Comp Classroom

CCR 611: Comp Histories/Theories · Disability Studies

Rhetorical Constructions of Remediation

I’ve been researching the rhetorical constructions of Asperger Syndrome, and when I approached this week’s readings for Comp Histories/Theories, I saw a theme emerging from Shaughnessy, Lu, and Rose that addressed the development of the “remedial” student. The frustrations that revolve around basic writing courses—that students are so far behind or that they cannot succeed within… Continue reading Rhetorical Constructions of Remediation