CCR 611: Comp Histories/Theories

Composition in the University: Historical and Polemical Essays

It was useful to read Crowley after Berlin and interesting to see her whole argument in this collection of essays as opposed to the one chapter I had been assigned to read before this (“A Personal Essay on Freshman English,” which made her seem so extreme that it was difficult to even fathom her argument).… Continue reading Composition in the University: Historical and Polemical Essays

CCR 611: Comp Histories/Theories · Rhetoric

Rhetoric and Reality: Writing Instruction in American Colleges, 1900-1985

Some things about reading for exams are wildly stressful—like trying to figure out how to cram all the books on the reading list into an unbelievably short period of time. Others, though, remind me of why I’m interested in this field. Re-reading Berlin was one of those reminders—not necessarily because I’m head over heels for… Continue reading Rhetoric and Reality: Writing Instruction in American Colleges, 1900-1985

Uncategorized

Evocative Objects Workshop #4c13

This morning, I attended the workshop “Evocative Objects: Re-imaging the Possibilities of Multimodal Composition led by Jody Shipka, Erin Anderson, Kerry Banazek, and Amber Buck. Here is the workshop’s pitch: The workshop challenges the common tendency to conflate multimodality with digital media in the larger field of composition. Indeed, when they are considered at all,… Continue reading Evocative Objects Workshop #4c13

Disability Studies

Crip Theory: Cultural Signs of Queerness and Disability

Even though Crip Theory was published before Disability Theory, it was really useful for me to read them in the reverse order. It helped to read some strictly disability theory prior to diving into how it intersects with queer theory, which is admittedly not my field. My reading of this book was also aided by McRuer’s… Continue reading Crip Theory: Cultural Signs of Queerness and Disability