Scholarship

#4c16

This is my presentation for #4c16 this year: “Reciprocal Disclosures: Co-Constructing Knowledge about Disability & Writing.” I presented on some of this dissertation research last year, which you can access here, but this year I am focusing on methodological challenges. *** In Toward a New Rhetoric of Difference, Stephanie Kerschbaum argues that writing studies research—despite…… Continue reading #4c16

Disability Studies

Self-Reflexive Research

I’m back to dissertation writing. Specifically, I’m working on the last major chapter of my dissertation (save the conclusion) that involves parsing out the data I collected from students and instructors about their perceptions of the in/accessibility of writing classrooms and writing centers. To get myself in a methodological mindset, I decided to check out…… Continue reading Self-Reflexive Research

CCR 611: Comp Histories/Theories

Rhetoric at the Margins: Revising the History of Writing Instruction in American Colleges, 1873-1947

In the preface to his book, Gold offers some context for his site selection and the arguments he plans to develop. The purpose of his book is to examine rhetorical education at three historically neglected institutions: Wiley College (a private HBCU), Texas Woman’s University (a public all-women’s college), and East Texas Normal school (an independent…… Continue reading Rhetoric at the Margins: Revising the History of Writing Instruction in American Colleges, 1873-1947

CCR 635: Advanced Research Practices

Angels’ Town, Take Two

I already have a post about this book, highlighting three key themes, which is here. This post, however, is a chapter-by-chapter breakdown (who, quite frankly, deserves the detailed attention). And although I spent way too much time re-reading this, I’m glad I did because I love this book. *** “How does one create respect under conditions…… Continue reading Angels’ Town, Take Two

CCR 635: Advanced Research Practices · Uncategorized

Feminist Rhetorical Practices: 4 Hot Methodological Concepts

Whew! I told Tim and Kate that when you highlight something in the Acknowledgments section, you know it’s going to be a hot book. There are so many different things to talk about here, but I thought I would just take some time to hash out the four methodological concepts Royster & Kirsch present: critical…… Continue reading Feminist Rhetorical Practices: 4 Hot Methodological Concepts

CCR 635: Advanced Research Practices

Angels’ Town: Chero Ways, Gang Life, and Rhetorics of the Everyday

I wanted to approach this week’s blog post a little differently. Instead of summarizing Cintron (because, honestly, I’m not sure I can do a good summary of this!), I wanted to point to some different themes that caught my eye while I was reading the last three chapters. 1) Metaphor (or Topos) of Disorder. Like…… Continue reading Angels’ Town: Chero Ways, Gang Life, and Rhetorics of the Everyday

CCR 635: Advanced Research Practices

The Anthropology of Writing

Since I didn’t pick any specific chapters to read for this week, I thought I’d read the first two chapters of The Anthropology of Writing: Understanding Textually-Mediated Worlds to contextualize everyone else’s discussions. This collection seeks to bring together two writing research traditions: the (French) anthropology of writing and (English-speaking) New Literacy Studies (Barton and…… Continue reading The Anthropology of Writing

Writing Centers

“Mapping Knowledge-Making in Writing Center Research”

I’ve been wading around in writing center research for the past couple weeks and wanted to share one of the articles that I found most helpful for thinking about writing center research. Unlike other helpful texts about writing center research from the early 2000s (e.g. Writing Center Research: Extending the Conversation and The Center Will Hold: Critical Perspectives…… Continue reading “Mapping Knowledge-Making in Writing Center Research”

CCR 635: Advanced Research Practices

A Contextualist Research Paradigm

Cindy Johanek’s Composing Research: A Contextualist Paradigm for Rhetoric and Composition addresses composition’s debates over the values of quantitative and qualitative research methods, creating a false dichotomy of epistemologies [e.g. narrative vs. numerical]. The showdown between quant/qual is self-defeating: it limits what research methods we can use, thus limiting the research itself. To move away…… Continue reading A Contextualist Research Paradigm