Scholarship

Reflections 2014: Engaging the Possibilities of Disability Studies

My previous post reminded me to share the super exciting table of contents for the Fall 2014 special issue of Reflections: A Journal of Public Rhetoric, Civic Writing, and Service Learning that I’ve been working on since last spring. It should be ready for print next month, and the content is so so good. Check it out! (Note:… Continue reading Reflections 2014: Engaging the Possibilities of Disability Studies

CCR 632: Comp Pedagogy

Skype Interview with Adam Banks

Adam Banks is a really smooth speaker, and we had a great discussion about community work, critically discussing race in the classroom, integrating useful technological practices, and how to make class spaces accessible. Here are some quick highlights: I see my main responsibility as helping my students to claim roles for themselves as intellectuals. To see… Continue reading Skype Interview with Adam Banks

CCR 632: Comp Pedagogy · Rhetoric

Race, Rhetoric, and Technology: Searching for Higher Ground

Recently, I read Adam Banks’s Race, Rhetoric, and Technology: Searching for Higher Ground. According to Banks, this book’s project is not to answer either/or questions about technology, society’s development, and exclusion; instead, it traces the technologies used within the African American rhetorical tradition to unseat racism and exclusion based on technological practices (2). Very generally, then,… Continue reading Race, Rhetoric, and Technology: Searching for Higher Ground

Disability Studies

Krip-Hop Nation: Disability in the Hip-Hop Mix

This afternoon, Syracuse University’s Beyond Compliance Coordinating Committee (BCCC) sponsored “Krip-Hop Nation: Disability in the Hip-Hop Mix.” According to their official Myspace page, Krip-Hop Nation is a group of disabled hip-hop artists who aim to “educate the music, media industries and general public about the talents, history, rights and marketability of Hip-Hop artists and other musicians with disabilities.”… Continue reading Krip-Hop Nation: Disability in the Hip-Hop Mix